Tudor Lodge meets at Halsey Masonic Hall, Watford and holds Regular meetings four times a year.
In addition, a number of Lodge of Instruction (LOI) or rehearsal meetings are held throughout the year from September to May.

 MEETING PLACE

Halsey Masonic Hall
Rickmansworth Road
Watford
WD18 0JE

REGULAR MEETINGS

2nd Wednesday January (Installation)
3rd Wednesday February
1st Wednesday May
2nd Wednesday October 

LOI MEETINGS

Tuesday evenings
from September to May

Dates available from Lodge Secretary

Lodge Meeting Place

Contact Email for

Lodge Secretary

Mobirise

The Tudor Lodge No. 7280 was consecrated on 9th July 1953, the Tudor name being chosen to commemorate the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. The Consecration ceremony was conducted by the RW The Rev. Dr. Joseph Moffett, the Provincial Grand Master at the time, assisted by the Deputy Provincial Grand Master, Col. Alexander Wood. Abbots Langley was the sponsoring Lodge. The Founders were local business men, most of who were members of London Lodges. The Tudor Crest is formed with the Hartford centrepiece, flanked with the two Masonic columns bridged by the Tudor Lodge inscribed banner. The background is the Square and Compasses, the whole standing on the traditional tesselated pavement. The Ritual performed by the Lodge is a combination of Emulation words and West End floorwork. As a result, the Lodge has produced it's own Ritual books covering all of the ceremonies.

Mobirise

The origin of the name of Tudor Lodge is briefly explained above. Other explanations are that the founders lived on the Tudor Estate in Watford and frequented the local Tudor Arms pub where LOI meetings were held when the Lodge was first formed.
However, the link to Queen Elizabeth II can be explained further, despite the fact that the Tudor name is not part of the Windsor family name. Queen Elizabeth II is the fourteenth Great Granddaughter of King Henry VII, the founder of the Tudor dynasty.

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